CCI found thirteen manufacturers/ suppliers of “CN bomb container” guilty of cartelization (price fixing and collusive bidding)

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Held- Thirteen manufacturers/ suppliers of “CN bomb container” held guilty of cartelization.

The Competition Commission of India (CCI) in its suo moto cognizance found thirteen suppliers/manufacturers (opposite parties) of containers with disc required for 81 mm bomb have engaged in the practices of determination of purchase price of “CN Container” (the Product) and collusive bidding in contravention of the provisions of sections 3(3)(a) and 3(3)(d) read with section 3(1) of the Competition Act, 2002.

The Director General formulated 3 basis issues in the present case.

1.) Whether the peculiar market conditions encouraged collusive action by the bidders.

2.) Did the bidders act according to an agreement to quote similar prices.

3.) Whether the bidders had also colluded to impose any quantitative restrictions?

The CCI considering the remote possibilities of direct evidence in the case of cartel reiterate its earlier decisions that the existence of an anti-competitive practice or agreement can be inferred from the circumstantial evidence i.e. conduct of the colluding parties.  Such conduct may include a number of coincidences and indicia which, taken together and in absence of any plausible explanation, points towards the existence of a collusive agreement.

The Commission noted that, in the absence of any such an anti-competitive agreement, the bidders would have not only competed against each other (on price) but may have also undercut each other to secure the contract which would have resulted in lower prices for the consumers.

Therefore, the consumers, i.e., the three ordinance factories, have also been deprived of the benefits that could have accrued to them on account of the competitive bidding process. The Commission in its order directed the opposite parties to cease and desist from the anti-competitive practices and imposed a penalty at the rate of 3% of the average turnover of the relevant financial years.

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